WannaCry is why you should never store your data on an unsecure device

The breaking news arrived early Friday afternoon. Hackers managed to restrict access to important data files at Britain’s National Health Service, canceling surgeries and causing hell for emergency room doctors and nurses. By the end of the weekend, the unleashed ransomware affected hundreds of thousands of computers in over 150 countries. It was the largest ransomware scheme in history, affecting hospitals, banks, telecommunications companies, and a host of players in other vital sectors of our daily lives.

It’s still too early to know exactly who launched the attack that preyed on vulnerabilities found in Microsoft’s older operating systems (some are already pointing the finger at North Korea). However, what it clear is that the hackers stole the complex coding from the NSA, who kept files on Microsoft’s weaknesses. While Microsoft issued security patches for newer operating systems to avoid mass-scale breeches, they left everyone else – including those running the still popular Windows XP – unprotected. The hackers are now threating to take advantage of security gaps in Windows 10 and to expand their damage.

When it comes to internet security, you cannot rely on anyone but yourself. Governments like to flaunt cybersecurity strategies and claim that they’re preparing for the future. Yet when an attack comes, there’s little they can do. In this case, the coding for the global crisis came from a government agency. Similarly, Microsoft failed to protect their most vulnerable users, even after hints that a virus could exploit the issues in their platform.

When it infected a computer, the WannaCry ransomware warned affected users that files on a system would be erased if a bitcoin payment was not made. Decades of medical records in Britain were held hostage, as were financial documents and proprietary information around the globe. The destructive nature of this threat was catastrophic.

While Microsoft may not be able to protect all its users, there is no reason for people to be held at a digital gunpoint. The issue at hand here is the proper storage of files. If important files are not stored directly on a computer, that computer can be compromised without worrying about what happened to important files. Getting hacked is not ideal, but it’s much less worrying if you know that all your files are safe and cannot be held for ransom.

This is what using Evizone brings you. Whether your phone gets stolen, you get hacked, or you lose your computer, you can rest assured that all your files are stored in a single, secure server protected by Evizone’s patented encryption. Since no files are actually stored on any device you would normally use to access the data, there is no way for hackers or thieves to gain entry into your most sensitive information.

Who is Evizone right for? The answer is simple: everyone. Whether you manage a Fortune 500 company, run a hospital, work at a law firm, or head a small investment company, you stand to lose in the event of a systems breach, whether it’s indiscriminate or targeted directly at you. Don’t wait until it’s too late to take cybersecurity seriously.